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findmegpstracker.com promotes the well being of our loved ones suffering from Dementia.

Dementia is a syndrome which covers a spectrum of degenerative disorders. It manifests as a progressive decline in functioning that affects cognitive skills, personality and behaviour and has a profound impact on individuals, families and communities, posing significant challenges to quality of life.

The number of people with dementia across the world increases every year as our global population ages. It is fast becoming known as the public health concern of the 21st Century. Someone in the world develops dementia every 3 seconds. There were an estimated 46.8 million people worldwide living with dementia in 2015 and this number is believed to be close to 50 million people in 2017. This number will almost double every 20 years, reaching 75 million in 2030 and 131.5 million in 2050.

Dementia Research and development of improving lives of the ever increasing Brain disease can only be cured by the best scientists researching it.

Wicking Dementia Centre in Tasmania, Australia, not only deliver ground breaking research but, they also hold free MOOC (Massive Open Online Courses) for anyone who is interested in learning about Dementia.

Wicking, in collaboration of UTAS, University of Tasmania, also deliver the worlds first Bachelors Degree in Dementia Care and is available online for anyone in the world. So, if you buy, you’re also helping with important research to try and cure Dementia for our future generations.

We invite you and anyone that you know to follow the two links below to register your interest and bringing Dementia into the forefront to remove stigmas associated with it and better care for your loved ones and urge health professionals to up skill.

Understanding Dementia – http://www.utas.edu.au/wicking/understanding-dementia

Preventing Dementia – http://www.utas.edu.au/wicking/preventing-dementia

Donate to R&D here- http://www.utas.edu.au/wicking/donate

Ref. Wicking Dementia Centre and dementia statistics from Alzheimer’s Disease International